Perspectives on the World Christian Movement

Social justice is not a topic that can be avoided in light of Scripture, and last week the Perspectives team did a great job of bringing it to the surface for students to actively consider what work God has for them in this area.

If you know me well, you’ve heard me talk about Perspectives on the World Christian Movement. I think everyone who can should check it out. I’m taking the course for the second time. Last time I took it, we lived in Louisiana and our three little ones were all under age four. Now our youngest is four, and we’ve added another child to the crew through international adoption. I haven’t been doing the weekly reading or homework this time since I already earned my course certificate, but simply attending the lectures and participating in a small group has been a dynamic experience. Though the class has students of all ages, I sit at a table with high school and college students. It’s hard to believe I’m almost twice their age now! I think I need to start hanging out with more teenagers like them, because they inspire me on a weekly basis. 🙂

This week the Perspectives team tackled social justice and the gospel. As followers of Christ, how do we serve a world reflected by these statistics?

50% of the world’s population lives on less than $2 a day.

1 in 6 people lacks adequate shelter.

1 in 4 live without electricity.

1 in 9 people suffer from chronic undernourishment.

Malnourishment accounts for 45% of all child deaths.

1 in 7 people lacks access to safe water.

80% of illnesses are linked to poor water in the developing world.

2.5 billion people lack access to improved sanitation.

1040

Nobody enjoys having statistics thrown at them, but these reflect the state of the world, where Christ came to reconcile all things (Colossians 1:20).

“We can expect that God will enable His people to wage war with disease, to break the vicious cycles of poverty, to provide water in desert lands, and to be present with healing in the midst of catastrophe.” – Perspectives Reader, page 39

A rep from International Justice Mission shared in class about their global casework, including sex trafficking, forced labor slavery, sexual violence against children, and property grabbing. The whole concept of Scriptural justice (Amos 5:24) was addressed.

A discussion about abuse of the most vulnerable, including orphans, got me thinking about our own Kami Joy. She represents some of the “loaves and fishes” we’ve brought to Jesus, trusting that He would do something miraculous with them. She’s one single person – we didn’t fix the corruption of the orphanage system that kept her drugged and neglected, and we didn’t offer any long-term solutions for the children left behind. But God didn’t call us to fix the system by ourselves. He’s called us to bring Him what we have, which for us was an empty chair at our table.

Photos: Kami in Bulgaria, December 2013, and with us (wearing the scarf) April 2017

God’s people must be willing to go into darkness to rescue others. The last Perspectives instructor pointed out that some of the most vulnerable people in America are those in the foster system. They have no one to defend them, making them easy prey for traffickers who are looking to exploit weak ones. There’s a big movement of young families stepping up to become foster parents, making sacrifices (including the peace of their homes) in order to stand up for the fatherless. Mason and I have considered adopting a child from the foster system, and I know the Lord will show us when the time is right. Social justice is not a topic that can be avoided in light of Scripture, and last week the Perspectives team did a great job of bringing it to the surface for students to actively consider what work God has for them in this area.

This is one small taste of Perspectives on the World Christian Movement. I hope you look for a class in your area. Only one week is dedicated to the social justice issue; other topics include His Kingdom Come, Unleashing the Gospel, and Building Bridges of Love. By the end of the 15 weeks, you’ll be ruined for the ordinary. And that’s a good thing, a very good thing.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s